Genealogy 101

 

Mean ancestors and what to say about them

April 12, 2012

What should you say about the mean ancestors you find while researching your family? That’s a good question. I found one reference on Rootsweb.com where a researcher listed her ancestor as “a drunk and a womanizer.” The article went on to tell what a cheat and unsavory person this man was. This woman was just being honest about the stories she’d been told about certain family members. I didn’t know whether to laugh or cry.

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First name traditions provide clues tinyFirst name traditions provide clues and create nightmares

April 15, 2012

Morning customs during the civil war era tinyMourning customs during the Civil War era

April 12, 2012

Understanding the mourning customs during the American Civil War era gives us valuable insight into how our ancestors honored the dead. This time period also broke tradition on the time set aside to grieve before remarriage. Plus I find the subject fascinating.

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Family genealogy database for adopteesFree genealogy database for adoptees

April 12, 2012

Research for adoptees is very different from regular genealogy in that you’re going in with very little information. You may only have your own date or birth and the town you were born in. Sometimes searching for a birth mother or child feels like looking for a needle in a haystack.

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Family cemeteries lost found and moved tinyFamily cemeteries: Lost, found and moved

April 12, 2012

Up until the last century it was common for a family to maintain a private cemetery on their own property. While there are many private cemeteries in the northern U.S., the south has the north outnumbered. It’s estimated that Tennessee alone has at least 20,000 private family cemeteries.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whats with all the cousin marriages tinyWhat’s with all the cousin marriages?

April 10, 2012

Using DNA as a tool tinyUsing genetic memory as a genealogical tool

April 10, 2012

Insane asylums and family research

Insane asylum tiny

April 10, 2012

Chances are good you’ll eventually find an ancestor or two who was committed to an insane asylum. While this is important information in regards to the mental health of family in your generation, it’s not always something you want to make known. This is one decision you must make on whether to publish a history of mental illness in the family or keep it quiet.

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Why did people photograph the dead tinyWhy did people photograph the dead?

April 10, 2012

I want to approach this subject early on in my series of genealogy because of the likelihood you will uncover a few photographs of dead ancestors. I can warn you that the first time you encounter one will be a shock to your system. I feel the more you understand why people photographed the dead, the less likely you are to scream at your first encounter.

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Anatomy of a death certificate tinyAnatomy of a death certificate

April 7, 2012

An ancestors death certificate is my very favorite source for information. Not only on who that person was and their lineage. A death certificate also gives the genealogy researcher a treasure trove of data. Here you can find everything from the cause of death to the cemetery of interment and everything in between.

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How to record information in a cemetery tinyHow to record information in a cemetery

April 7, 2012

I wish I’d had this article when I first began recording information in a cemetery. I would have saved me a lot of repeat visit from my forgetting which tombstone was at which cemetery.

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Why are there so many database mistakes tinyWhy are there so many database mistakes?

April 7, 2012

At some point in your genealogical research you’re going to either make or find mistakes. If you have a public document, such as a death or birth certificate, it’s a good idea to let the person making the mistake know about it.

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Public records and family bibles tinyPublic records and family Bibles

April 7, 2012

Regardless of the information you find online regarding your family tree, keep in mind public records and family Bibles are the most reliable. They are legally binding as proof what you’re recording into your family tree software is true. Sure, mistakes may be made, but they are few and far between.

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Recording family stories tinyRecording family stories

April 6, 2012

Recording family stories is one of the most interesting activities of a genealogist. Even a beginner can enjoy this activity.

 The best family story of all time, and the proverbial thorn in my side, is the story that began my search. It’s ironic he’s the one ancestor I can’t close my research on because he disappeared off the face of the earth after the American Civil War.

Who should I talk to tinyWho should I talk to and what should I ask?

April 6, 2012

The two questions I hear most when talking to someone for the first time about gathering family information is “who should I talk to” and “what should I ask.”

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GEDCOM tinyGEDCOM Files And Website Recommendations

April 6, 2012

A GEDCOM is a file specifically for family tree research. GEDCOM is short for genealogical data communication and was developed by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. The church has been a big believe in recording family ancestry for many generations now. I used their local library located in the church for many years in the years before the internet.

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Getting started at genealogy tinyGetting Started At Genealogy

April 6, 2012

Since the TV show “Who Do You Think You Are?” debuted on NBC, millions have began a search for their family roots.

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